Physics 2013-2014 | Kyle Dittmer

Month

Standards

Indicators

Assessment

August-September

 

 

 

Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

Objective 1: Describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, and velocity.

Objective 2: Analyze the motion of an object in terms of velocity, time, and acceleration.

• What is the difference between distance and displacement?

• What is the difference between speed and velocity?

• How do you calculate the average and instantaneous velocity of an object from data given?

• How do you determine the average acceleration of an object from given data?

• Can you interpret data for position vs. time graphs and interpret data for velocity vs. time graphs in order to describe the motion involved?

October

 

 

 

Standard I: Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

 

Standard II: Students will understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

Objective 4: Use Newton's first law to explain the motion of an object.

 

Objective 1: Analyze forces acting

on an object

• If the forces are balanced on a moving object, describe the motion of that object?

• What is the difference between a stationary object on which balanced forces are acting and a moving object on which balanced forces are acting?

• What are the types of forces commonly encountered on a moving object?

• How can you tell the forces are balanced on an object?

• What types of forces are encountered in everyday life?

• Describe the forces acting on an object by drawing force diagrams.

November

 

 

 

Standard 2: Students will understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

 

Standard 2: Students will

understand the relation between force, mass, and acceleration.

Objective 2: Using Newton’s second law, relate the force, mass, and acceleration of an object.

 

Objective 3: Explain that forces act in pairs as described by Newton’s third law.

• What is the relationship between the net force on an object and the object’s   acceleration?

• How does mass affect acceleration when a constant unbalanced force is applied?

• Measure the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration from experimental data and compare the results to Newton’s second law.

• Predict the combined effect of multiple forces (e.g., friction, gravity, and normal forces) on an object’s motion.

• What are some examples of action-reaction forces?

• Determine the magnitude and direction of the acting force when magnitude and direction of the reacting force is known.

• What are some everyday applications of Newton’s third law?

• How does the historical development of Newton’s laws of motion compare to our current understanding of the nature of science?

December

 

 

 

Standard III: Students will understand the factors determining the strength of gravitational and electric forces.

 

Standard IV: Students will understand transfer and conservation of energy.

Objective 1: Relate the strength of

the gravitational force to the

distance between two objects and the mass of the objects (i.e., Newton’s law of universal gravitation).

 

Objective 1: Determine kinetic and potential energy in a system.

• How does mass affect the gravitational force?

• What is the difference between mass and weight?

• How does the distance between two objects affect the gravitational force between them?

• What is meant by zero gravity?

• Identify various types of potential energy.

• How do mass and velocity contribute to the kinetic energy of an object?

• How do mass and height contribute to the gravitational potential energy of an object?

• How do kinetic and potential energy contribute to the total energy of a given system?

January

 

 

 

Standard IV: Students will

Understand transfer and conservation of energy.

 

Standard 4 Students will understand transfer and conservation of energy.

Objective 2: Describe conservation of energy in terms of systems.

 

Objective 3: Describe common

energy transformations and the

effect on availability of energy

each transformation

• Describe a closed system in terms of its total energy.

• How do potential energy and kinetic energy interrelate on a rollercoaster ride?

• Gather data and calculate the gravitational potential energy and the kinetic energy of an object and relate this to the conservation of energy of a system.

• Where does the loss of useful energy in energy transformations go?

• What are the three major ways heat is transferred?

• Describe the transformation of mechanical, electrical, and chemical energy in some everyday systems and how the transmission of thermal energy plays its role.

February

 

 

 

Standard V: Students will understand the properties and applications of waves.

Objective 1: Demonstrate an understanding of mechanical waves in terms of general wave properties.

• Define the following: period, frequency, wavelength, and amplitude of waves.

• Give examples of reflection, refraction, and diffraction of waves commonly observed in nature.

• How do you solve for the speed, wavelength, and frequency of a wave?

• Compare the change in frequency you observe in a wave coming from a moving object as it approaches an observer to moving away from an observer.

• What does the medium of a mechanical wave transfer?

March

 

 

 

Standard V: Students will

understand the properties and applications of waves.

 

Standard III: Students will understand the factors determining the strength of gravitational and electric forces.

Objective 2: Describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation and visible light.

 

Objective 2: Describe the factors

that affect the electric force (i.e.,

Coulomb’s law).

• What is the relationship between energy, wavelength and frequency for electromagnetic radiation?

• How do the wavelengths and frequencies differ among parts of the electromagnetic spectrum?

• Understand that all the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum travel through empty

space at the speed of light.

• What are some examples of electromagnetic radiation in everyday life?

• Show that the relationship between distance and electric force is the same as the relationship between distance and gravitational force.

• Understand that like charges repel and unlike charges attract.

• How does the amount of charge affect the electric force?

• Give examples of electric forces found in everyday life.

April

 

 

 

Standard 1: Students will understand how to measure, calculate, and describe the motion of an object in terms of position, time, velocity, and acceleration.

Objective 3: Relate the motion of objects to a frame of reference.

• Compare the motion of an object relative to two frames of reference.

• What is the rate of an object relative to a different frame of reference? (e.g., The rate of an object dropped from a moving vehicle being observed from the vehicle compared to being observed by a person standing on the sidewalk).

• Simplify a problem by selecting a specific frame of reference to describe the motion of an object.

May-June

 

 

 

CRT Review

CRT Review

CRT