AP Physics C 2013-2014 | Kyle Dittmer

Month

Standards

Indicators

Assessment

August-September

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Explore calculus as a problem solving tool, and how to explore a problem to find the best approach to finding its solution.

Understand dot and cross products and how to use them as a tool to simplify solutions, and to further their understanding of the derivation of formulas.

Introduction to the use of differential and integral calculus.

Labs;

             Projectile lab… using video images to construct s/t, v/t, and a/t graphs for the vertical dimension and the horizontal dimension, and finding the inter-relation of their slopes, intercepts, and areas.

Test

October

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Re-examine F= ma as a differential equation.

Examine fluid friction, and the resulting differential equations.

 

Energy and momentum

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Understand conservative and non-conservative forces and their relation to changes in potential energy.

Calculate changes in potential energy of a system of masses in a uniform and non-uniform gravitational field, and relate them to changes in kinetic energy and other forms of work.

Be able to find the center of mass of simple masses of non-uniform density, and use it to solve momentum and gravitational problems.

Be able to relate the law of conservation of momentum to Newton’s third law.

Examine changes in the above in situations in which the net force is changing either with time or displacement.

Labs;

             Dropping ball bearings into oil, recording their motion, and analyzing the data to find a common constant that describes the resistance to motion provided by the oil.

             Atwood’s machine; first with a heavy rope, and then with a bucket of water that ‘leaks’ sand at a constant rate.

Test

November

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Re-examine F= ma as a differential equation.

Examine fluid friction, and the resulting differential equations.

 

Energy and momentum

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Understand conservative and non-conservative forces and their relation to changes in potential energy.

Calculate changes in potential energy of a system of masses in a uniform and non-uniform gravitational field, and relate them to changes in kinetic energy and other forms of work.

Be able to find the center of mass of simple masses of non-uniform density, and use it to solve momentum and gravitational problems.

Be able to relate the law of conservation of momentum to Newton’s third law.

Examine changes in the above in situations in which the net force is changing either with time or displacement.

Labs;

             Dropping ball bearings into oil, recording their motion, and analyzing the data to find a common constant that describes the resistance to motion provided by the oil.

             Atwood’s machine; first with a heavy rope, and then with a bucket of water that ‘leaks’ sand at a constant rate.

Test

December

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Re-examine F= ma as a differential equation.

Examine fluid friction, and the resulting differential equations.

 

Energy and momentum

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Understand conservative and non-conservative forces and their relation to changes in potential energy.

Calculate changes in potential energy of a system of masses in a uniform and non-uniform gravitational field, and relate them to changes in kinetic energy and other forms of work.

Be able to find the center of mass of simple masses of non-uniform density, and use it to solve momentum and gravitational problems.

Be able to relate the law of conservation of momentum to Newton’s third law.

Examine changes in the above in situations in which the net force is changing either with time or displacement.

Labs;

             Dropping ball bearings into oil, recording their motion, and analyzing the data to find a common constant that describes the resistance to motion provided by the oil.

             Atwood’s machine; first with a heavy rope, and then with a bucket of water that ‘leaks’ sand at a constant rate.

Test

January

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Understand angular displacement, velocity, acceleration, momentum, and understand torque, KE of rotating bodies, and angular inertia.

Be able to derive the angular inertia of simple shapes, and use the parallel axes theorem.

Be able to solve complex problems that involve changes in both linear and angular quantities. 

 

Labs;

             Confirmation of the moments of inertia about various axes of various shapes using a known torque.

             Predicting and confirming the moment of inertia of everyday items (brick, rolling pin, etc.)

             Atwood’s machine, with a pulley wheel of significant mass.

Test

February

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Understand angular displacement, velocity, acceleration, momentum, and understand torque, KE of rotating bodies, and angular inertia.

Be able to derive the angular inertia of simple shapes, and use the parallel axes theorem.

Be able to solve complex problems that involve changes in both linear and angular quantities. 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Relate simple harmonic motion to the analogy of a point rotating with constant angular velocity, and thus derive the fundamental equations of SHM.

Derive a differential equation that describes the SHM, and be able to solve the equation.

Understand how to predict displacement, velocity, acceleration and energy at any time or position, and when and where their maximum and minimum are achieved, particularly for an ideal spring and the pendulum (simple and compound).

Lab;

 

Labs;

             Confirmation of the moments of inertia about various axes of various shapes using a known torque.

             Predicting and confirming the moment of inertia of everyday items (brick, rolling pin, etc.)

             Atwood’s machine, with a

pulley wheel of significant mass.

             Mass oscillating on the end of spring with weight as the restoring force… an investigation into damping

Test

March

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Relate simple harmonic motion to the analogy of a point rotating with constant angular velocity, and thus derive the fundamental equations of SHM.

Derive a differential equation that describes the SHM, and be able to solve the equation.

Understand how to predict displacement, velocity, acceleration and energy at any time or position, and when and where their maximum and minimum are achieved, particularly for an ideal spring and the pendulum (simple and compound).

Lab;

             Mass oscillating on the end of spring with weight as the restoring force… an investigation into damping

             Mass oscillating on the end of spring with weight as the restoring force… an investigation into damping

Test

April

 

 

 

Review the physics ‘B’ work.

Kepler’s laws, and related problems.

Calculate changes in gravitational potential energy and KE in a non-uniform gravitational field.

             Non-circular orbit plotting to confirm Kepler’s laws

Test

May-June

 

 

 

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